Jul 31, 2014

tinytrees:

no one wants to be equal to privileged people

we want to dismantle the system that gives people privilege in the first place

so stop yr whining like “how can u say want EQUALITY if u dont kiss cishet ass 24/7??”

(via smitethepatriarchy)

Jul 31, 2014

prokopetz:

barnabasdeimos:

diglettdevious:

little-kitten-doll:

fast-and-fit:

THIS

To everyone who says it’s too expensive to eat on a budget. 

I love Twizzlers 

Where the fuck are you people buying your food that it costs so little?!

Note that virtually all of these price comparisons are complete horseshit. While it’s true that raw ingredients purchased in bulk can be cheaper than prepared or fast food, a naive price comparison doesn’t take into account a whole constellation of externalities, including:

  • Travel expenses. Grocery chains that sell raw ingredients in bulk often don’t have branches in or near low-income neighbourhoods, so the driving distance to reach one can be significant. If you have a low income, the gas you spend getting to and from the grocery store is a non-trivial component of your food’s total cost - and that’s assuming you own a car at all.
  • Storage expenses. Raw ingredients purchased in bulk need large amounts of storage space, and often that storage space needs to be refrigerated or climate-controlled. Many low-income households do not own large refrigerators or freezers, or cannot afford the electrical bills associated with keeping a large refrigerator or freezer running 24/7.
  • Preparation expenses. Raw ingredients purchased in bulk require appliances and tools to turn into edible food. Many low income households do not own a proper range or full-sized oven. Your food preparation options are sharply limited when all you have to work with is a microwave and a hot-plate - and, again, even if you do have a proper range and oven, actually using them incurs gas and electrical charges, which add to the real cost of your food.
  • Time. Driving to and from a distant grocery store takes time. Preparing food from raw ingredients takes time. This time expenditure can easily amount to hours per week - which is no particular impediment when you’re working a regular nine-to-five, but if you’re a single parent, or holding down multiple minimum-wage jobs with unpredictable schedules in order to make ends meet, that may well be time you don’t have. Plus, even if you can spare it, your time has monetary value (i.e., the time you’re spending purchasing and preparing food is time you’re not spending on any other productive endeavour), which again contributes to the real cost of your food.

Once all of these factors are properly taken into consideration, prepared and packaged food - and yes, sometimes even fast food - is indeed substantially less costly than purchasing raw ingredients in bulk and preparing your own food. Having the time, facilities, and convenience of access to prepare your own food from scratch every day is a luxury - and one that’s increasingly out of reach for many folks.

(via samanticshift)

Jul 31, 2014
Anonymous asked: How do you feel about this event thing called "Color me Rad" that seems to be catching on?

whitepeoplestealingculture:

"Dye-Ing Culture: Color Run, White-Washing Holi Since 2012" by by Nadya Agrawal

The Color Run™ and other similar ideas like Run or Dye™ is a great and fun way to run with your friends, come together as a community, get showered in colored powder and not have to deal with all that annoying culture that would come if you went to a Holi celebration.  There are no prayers for spring or messages of rejuvenation before these runs.  You won’t have to drink chai or try Indian food afterwards.  There is absolutely no way you’ll have to even think about the ancient traditions and culture this brand new craze is derived from.  Come uncultured, leave uncultured, that’s the Color Run, promise.

Doubtless you’ve seen posters advertising for Color Runs™ in your neighborhood – they’re the ones sporting happy white college kids covered in color.  You may have even paused for a second to appreciate the clear fun they’re all having as they enjoy a part of the desi culture.  But honestly, the Color Run™ does absolutely nothing to give credit where it’s due.  And to add insult to injury, they’ve trademarked out tradition.

According to the Color Run™ website, there are only two “simple rules”: 1) Wear white at the starting line and 2) Finish plastered in color.  That would’ve been an original idea if Indians hadn’t been doing it for hundreds, if not thousands of years.

The race ends with something called a “Color Festival” (actually in quotes on the website as well). Sounds an awful lot like a digestible name for Holi. Sorta like how white people call Diwali the “Festival of Lights” even though this is a major over-simplification—I don’t think we just light a whole bunch of candles and call it a night.  Nope, we tell stories from the Hindu Scripture, the Ramayana, share sweets and gifts, say prayers and welcome the New Year.

And at Holi, we don’t simply throw colors in each other’s faces—it’s a place to play with people you love and revel in the vibrancy of spring.  One of our favorite and most colorful holidays is being, pun intended, white-washed.  And it’s like we’ve been completely eradicated from this event as nowhere on the Color Run™ website is there mention of India, Holi, Krishna, or even spring.  Apparently this is a completely organic creation of the Color Run™ head honchos.  And they’re making loads of money from it.

There is a vague understanding that the Color Run™ pays out money to charities selected by their runners.  I cannot find evidence on the website (or the Yelp reviews) as to where exactly the money raised from the runs and their store goes and I have no idea how much of every dollar donated goes back in the Color Run™ administrative workings.  It seems even the runners, if the reviews are anything to go off of, don’t have a clear idea where their donations are going.  So, our culture is being co-opted to turn a profit, but at least you can buy a pair of super cute shorts that say “Color This!” Hai Ram, if our Dadis saw this, they’d be threatening thuppards all around.

I can bemoan the misuse of Holi, the profiting off our culture and the further sexualization of it, but I think worst of all is that it doesn’t give us the chance to share Holi properly.  Personally, I love it when I can bring my non-Desi friends to the annual campus Holi function.  I can show them a part of my heart and an aspect of my identity as a strong Brown woman. The Color Run™ robs me of that chance because now everyone who participates gets a diluted (and completely wrong) version of desi culture. With this Holi knockoff, they lose the culture and the tradition, but they keep our colors.

Read about the Hindu roots of Holi

(from browngirlmagazine.com)

Jul 31, 2014
Jul 31, 2014

thepeoplesrecord:

Florida city police department embedded with KKK members
July 21, 2014

Ann Hunnewell and her central Florida police officer husband knelt in the living room of a fellow officer’s home, with pillow cases as makeshift hoods over their heads. A few words were spoken and they, along with a half-dozen others, were initiated into the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, she says.

Last week, that initiation ceremony, which took place five years ago, stunned residents of the small town of Fruitland Park, who found out an investigative report linked two city officers with the secret hate society that once was violently active in the area. Ann Hunnewell’s ex-husband, George Hunnewell, was fired, and deputy chief David Borst resigned from the 13-member Fruitland Park Police Department. Borst has denied being a member.

James Elkins, a third officer who Ann Hunnewell says recruited her and her husband, resigned in 2010 after his Klan ties became public.

Read More

(via whiteguiltconfessionals)

Jul 31, 2014
profkew:

Historic Marker ~ Kristopher Monroe
The Weeping Time: A forgotten history of the largest slave auction ever on American soil

Two miles west of downtown Savannah, Georgia, sits a historical marker in the center of a small plot of a fenced in city park. The triangular park measures not more than a fifth of an acre. The surrounding neighborhood is one of the most distressed and depressed sections of the city.
The marker was dedicated on March 3, 2008, 149 years after the slave auction occurred, and at the commemoration ceremony then-mayor Otis Johnson—only the second African-American to hold that office—offered up a short speech honoring the enslaved men and women whose labor helped build the oldest city in the state of Georgia. At the ceremony a local man handed out dirt from Nigeria to be sprinkled around the marker and Mayor Johnson poured water over the dirt to consecrate the ground.

And that’s it for the city’s commemoration of the event known as the Weeping Time. Contrast that with the towering monument to the Confederate dead that has stood for over a century smack in the center of one of the city’s largest public parks.
The Weeping Time acquired its name colloquially, by the slaves and their descendants, because of reports that the sky opened up and poured down rain for the full two days of the auction. It was said that the heavens were weeping for the inhumanity that was being committed.
The event wasn’t just notable because of the size of the auction. In 1859 the country was on the verge of a national bloodbath, and the historic threads that weave through the story of the Weeping Time are so far-reaching and remarkable, it’s perplexing that more hasn’t been written or remembered about this time.
Read more here.

profkew:

Historic Marker ~ Kristopher Monroe

The Weeping Time: A forgotten history of the largest slave auction ever on American soil

Two miles west of downtown Savannah, Georgia, sits a historical marker in the center of a small plot of a fenced in city park. The triangular park measures not more than a fifth of an acre. The surrounding neighborhood is one of the most distressed and depressed sections of the city.

The marker was dedicated on March 3, 2008, 149 years after the slave auction occurred, and at the commemoration ceremony then-mayor Otis Johnson—only the second African-American to hold that office—offered up a short speech honoring the enslaved men and women whose labor helped build the oldest city in the state of Georgia. At the ceremony a local man handed out dirt from Nigeria to be sprinkled around the marker and Mayor Johnson poured water over the dirt to consecrate the ground.

And that’s it for the city’s commemoration of the event known as the Weeping Time. Contrast that with the towering monument to the Confederate dead that has stood for over a century smack in the center of one of the city’s largest public parks.

The Weeping Time acquired its name colloquially, by the slaves and their descendants, because of reports that the sky opened up and poured down rain for the full two days of the auction. It was said that the heavens were weeping for the inhumanity that was being committed.

The event wasn’t just notable because of the size of the auction. In 1859 the country was on the verge of a national bloodbath, and the historic threads that weave through the story of the Weeping Time are so far-reaching and remarkable, it’s perplexing that more hasn’t been written or remembered about this time.

Read more here.

(via kaleidoscopekyd)

Jul 30, 2014
Jul 30, 2014

stfumras:

vanillilla:

"uncircumcised men are gross"
no. you know what is gross. when the mutilation of newborn babies is so normalised that women will shame the men whose parents were fucking sane enough to not cut off a piece of their son’s dick for the sake of it

Circumcision is not mutilation.  Stop calling it that.  I am anti-circumcision but stop equating a safe medical practice with people who have actually had their genitals mutilated. 

(via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

Jul 29, 2014
We’re taught at such an early age to be against the communists, yet most of us don’t have the faintest idea what communism is. Only a fool lets somebody else tell him who his enemy is.
Assata Shakur (born July 16, 1947)

(Source: fuckyeahmarxismleninism, via official-mens-frights-activist)

Jul 29, 2014
The world’s 85 richest people have as much wealth as the world’s 3.5 billion poorest.
This statistic was recently released in United Nations report that uses Oxfam figures. It’s also a huge wake-up call for anyone who doesn’t consider income inequality a major issue in global politics. (via micdotcom)

(via official-mens-frights-activist)

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